Males vs. Females: Sexual Conflict 2 years ago

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In the animal kingdom, sex often involves more conflict than cooperation. The struggle between males and females leads to a host of weird adaptations, from chastity belts to anti-aphrodisiacs.

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Want to learn more about the topic in this week’s video? Here are some keywords/phrases to get your googling started:
Sexual conflict: an evolutionary mismatch between the interests of males and females, especially concerning mating strategies
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Credits:
Script Writer: Kate Yoshida (twitter: @KateYoshida)
Script Editor: Emily Elert (twitter: @eelert)
Video Illustrator: Ever Salazar (twitter: @eversalazar)
Video Director: Emily Elert (twitter: @eelert)
With Contributions From: Henry Reich (@minutephysics), Alex Reich (@alexhreich) and Peter Reich
Music by: Nathaniel Schroeder: http://www.soundcloud.com/drschroeder
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References:

Brennan, P.L.R., Clark, C.J., & Prum, R.O. (2010). Explosive eversion and functional morphology of the duck penis supports sexual conflict in waterfowl genitalia. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 277: 309–1314. http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/early/2009/12/18/rspb.2009.2139

Chapman, T., Arnqvist, G., Bangham J., & Rowe, L. (2003). Sexual conflict. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 18: 41–47. http://heart.sdsu.edu/~website/Biology_307/pdfs/ConflictReview.pdf

Dean, R., Nakagawa, S., & Pizzari, T. (2011). The risk and intensity of sperm ejection in female birds. American Naturalist 178(3): 343–354. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/661244

Hosken D.J. & Stockley, P. (2004). Sexual selection and genital evolution. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 19: 87-93. http://www.cell.com/trends/ecology-evolution/abstract/S0169-5347(03)00374-4

Koprowski, J.L. (1992). Removal of copulatory plugs by female tree squirrels. Journal of Mammalogy 732:572—76. http://jmammal.oxfordjournals.org/content/73/3/572

Price, C.S.C., Dyer, K.A., Coyne, J.A. (1999). Sperm competition between Drosophila males involves both displacement and incapacitation. Nature 400: 449-452. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v400/n6743/full/400449a0.html

Rowe, L., Arnqvist, G., Sih, A. & Krupa, J. J. (1994). Sexual conflict and the evolutionary ecology of mating patterns: water striders as a model system. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 9:289-293. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0169534794900329

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